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Atlantic Books for the Holidays

Description

"Going down the road" is part of the tradition of Atlantic Canada, but just as strong a tradition is coming back home for Christmas. When writers think of Christmas, home is on their minds, for better and for worse. Many of the stories in Home for Christmas relate to family, absent family or chosen families. A little sorrow, some ambivalence and a lot of joy visit Maritimers and Newfoundlanders at their Christmas tables. Following the success of Gifts to Last: Christmas Stories from the Maritimes and Newfoundland, Goose Lane is proud to present this all-new collection of Christmas stories. Like Gifts to Last, Home for Christmas contains stories by the region's finest writers, ranging from Lucy Maud Montgomery to Lynn Coady to Wayne Johnston. A few stories appear in Home for Christmas for the first time. Others are selected from books, including the funny yet poignant account of Hilda Porter's last Christmas from The Last Tasmanian by Herb Curtis and "Another Christmas," Ann Copeland's beautiful story of Sister Claire Delaney's first Christmas in the convent. Some authors, such as Maureen Hull and Kelly Cooper, are building strong reputations in literary periodicals, while others, including Harry Bruce and Mark Tunney, editor of The New Brunswick Reader, are journalists. In all, over 20 writers join their voices to make Home for Christmas express the wondrous variety of human nature and our longing for connection at Christmastime.

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About the Authors

Sabine Campbell

Sabine Campbell co-edited Fiddlehead Gold, an anthology marking the 50th anniversary of Canada's oldest literary magazine. As managing editor of The Fiddlehead and a member of its editorial staff since 1985, she knows the work of almost every writer in and from the Maritimes and Newfoundland.
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Jess Bond

Jess Bond was born and raised in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. A graduate of the University of New Brunswick and Fredericton Teachers' College, she taught elementary school in Fredericton for several years and then moved to Scarborough, Ontario, where she taught for twenty years. Now retired, she lives near Belleville, Ontario.
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Ann Copeland

Ann Copeland, a native of Connecticut, lived in Sackville, New Brunswick, for twenty-five years before moving to Salem, Oregon, in 1996. A popular fiction writing instructor at workshops in Canada, the US, and New Zealand, she is the author of The ABCs of Writing Fiction and six books of stories. The Golden Thread, linked stories about Sister Claire Delaney, was a finalist for a 1990 Governor General's Award; "Another Christmas," first published in the Fiddlehead, is part of Strange Bodies on a Stranger Shore, the sequel to The Golden Thread.
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Maureen Hull

Maureen Hull was born and raised on Cape Breton Island. She studied at nscad, Dalhousie University and the Pictou Fisheries School. She has worked at the costume department of Neptune Theatre and as a lobster fisher. She lives on Pictou Island in the Northumberland Strait. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies, most recently Christmas Family Treasures. Her short story collection, Righteous Living, was short-listed for the Danuta Gleed Award, and several of her stories have been read on CBC Radio.
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Kelly Cooper

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Sue Sinclair

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Mary Tunney

Mark Tunney is the editor of The New Brunswick Reader. Born in Toronto, he has lived in New Brunswick since 1982. Although he has been a journalist for many years, this is the first time his work has appeared in a book.
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Bernice Morgan

Bernice Morgan was born in preconfederate Newfoundland. She has worked for many years in public relations, first with Memorial University of Newfoundland, and later with Newfoundland Teachers’ Association. Many of her short stories have been published in small magazines, anthologies and school textbooks. The mother of two daughters and a son, she lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland. Random Passage, the 4-part television mini-series, based on her book, aired on CBC Television, beginning January 27, 2002.
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Ray Guy

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Syr Ruus

Syr Ruus was born in Estonia at the start of the Second World War. As a small child, she escaped with her mother to Germany. After the war ended they lived in various DP camps before immigrating to the United States where she grew up and received her education. In 1970, she moved to Nova Scotia, working as a teacher while raising her three children. She has written a prize-winning juvenile novel and published short fiction in anthologies and journals. Lovesongs of Emmanuel Taggart is the recipient of the H.R. (Bill) Percy Prize from the Writers Federation of Nova Scotia.
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Lynn Coady

Lynn Coady is the author of the bestselling novel The Antagonist, which was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, as well as the novels Mean Boy, Saints of Big Harbour, and Strange Heaven and the short story collection Play the Monster Blind. — — Website: — http://www.lynncoady.com/? — Twitter:? http://www.twitter.com/lynn_coady
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Ted Russell

Edward “Ted” Russell was born in Coley’s Point, Conception Bay, in 1904. At sixteen, he undertook his first teaching assignment at Pass Island. For the next twenty-three years, he worked in outport communities as a teacher and later a magistrate. In 1943 he moved to St. John’s to accept the position of Director of Co-operatives for the Commission of Government. After a brief stint in politics (a member of the first Smallwood cabinet), Ted returned to teaching. But he also found a new opportunity to give expression to the more creative side of his nature. In 1953 he was offered a spot on CBC Radio’s Fishermen’s Broadcast as Uncle Mose. The highly successful “The Chronicles of Uncle Mose” continued until 1962. During this period Ted also wrote several radio plays, all of which were broadcast by CBC. The last years of his working life were spent on the faculty of Memorial University (English department) from which he retired in 1973. He died four years later. Ted married Dora Oake (of Change Islands) in 1934. They had five children: Rhona, Elizabeth “Betty,” June, Margaret “Peggy,” and Kelly.
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Lucy Maud Montgomery

Lucy Maud Montgomery (November 30, 1874 - April 24, 1942), publicly known as L. M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for her 1908 novel Anne of Green Gables. The book was an immediate success. The central character, Anne Shirley, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following. Montgomery went on to publish 20 novels as well as 530 short stories, 500 poems, and 30 essays. Most of the novels were set in Prince Edward Island, and locations within Canada's smallest province became a literary landmark and popular tourist site-namely Green Gables farm, the genesis of Prince Edward Island National Park. She was made an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935. Since then, Montgomery's work, diaries and letters have been read and studied by scholars and readers worldwide.
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Ephie Carrier

Ephie Carrier is retired and lives at Dumfries, New Brunswick. Born in Grand Falls, New Brunswick, he has lived in many parts of Canada and travelled all over the world. For the past several years he has been writing and telling stories for Storyfest New Brunswick. He is co-author with Jan Andrews of a children's book, Harvest (1999). His story "Just Pick Up the Sticks" appeared in Echoes (Maine).
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Patrick O'Flaherty

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Herb Curtis

Herb Curtis was raised near Blackville, on the Miramichi, and now lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick. His collection of short fiction, Luther Corhern's Salmon Camp Chronicles (1999), was nominated for the Stephen Leacock Award. The Last Tasmanian (1991, 2001), one of four novels, garnered the Thomas Head Raddall Atlantic Fiction Award and was a regional finalist for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize.
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David Weale

David Weale is a folk historian and a popular storyteller and stage performer. He has written thirteen books, four of which are for children. David co-created and wrote The True Meaning of Crumbfest, an animated Christmas special for children, seen in more than twenty-five countries around the world, as well as Eckhart, an animated TV series for children. He is the father of five children and presently lives with his dog, Breaker, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.
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Robert Gibbs

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Paul Bowdring

Paul Bowdring is the author of three previous novels, The Roncesvalles Pass, The Night Season, and The Strangers’ Gallery, the latter the winner of the BMO Winterset Award and a nominee for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. He has worked for many years as an English teacher and editor. He was a longtime editor of TickleAce magazine and is currently an associate editor with The Fiddlehead. He lives in St. John’s, NL.
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Clarissa Hurley

Clarissa Hurley, a writer and actor, lives in Fredericton. Her story "Women and Linen Look Best in the Dark" won first prize for short fiction in the 1998 New Brunswick Writers' Federation Competition.
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John Steffler

John Steffler

John Steffler’s critically acclaimed poetry collections include The Grey Islands, That Night We Were Ravenous, and Lookout, which won the Atlantic Poetry Prize. His novel The Afterlife of George Cartwright was shortlisted for the Governor General’s Literary Award for fiction. Steffler served as Parliamentary Poet Laureate of Canada from 2006 to 2008. He divides his time between Montreal and rural Ontario.

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Wayne Johnston

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Brian Bartlett

Brian Bartlett has published seven collections of poetry (including The Watchmaker’s Table and Wanting the Day: Selected Poems) and two books of prose (Ringing Here & There: A Nature Calendar and All Manner of Tackle: Living with Poetry). His writing has won numerous prizes, including the Atlantic Poetry Prize, The Malahat Review’s Long Poem Prize and the Acorn-Plantos Award for People’s Poetry. Bartlett lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he teaches at Saint Mary’s University.

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Harry Bruce

HARRY BRUCE is a Nova Scotian freelance journalist and author.
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Susan Haley

Susan Haley

Susan Haley’s first two novels, A Nest of Singing Birds and Getting Married in Buffalo Jump, were made into movies for CBC-TV. Most recently she has published The Complaints Department (2000), Maggie's Family (2002) and The Murder of Medicine Bear (2003). Haley and her partner ran a charter airline in Fort Norman, Northwest Territories, for 15 years. She now lives in Black River, Nova Scotia.

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Anne Simpson

Anne Simpson

Anne Simpson has published five collections of poetry, one of which, Loop, won the 2004 Griffin Poetry Prize. Her prose publications include The Marram Grass: Poetry & Otherness (2009) and three novels, most recently Speechless. Her mentorship of other writers has taken her to libraries and universities across Canada. She lives on an estuary in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, sharing space with ravens, herons, and bald eagles.

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David Helwig

David Helwig

David Helwig was born in Toronto. He taught at Queens University and was literary manager of CBC-TV Drama. He has been a full-time writer and editor since 1980, and has worked extensively with Oberon Press, Ottawa. Helwig has published numerous books of poetry and fiction, most recently The Child of Someone (1997), A Random Gospel (1996), This Human Day (2000) and Living Here (2001). His Catchpenny Poems won the CBC poetry award in 1983. Helwig lived on Prince Edward Island until his death in October 2018.

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Robert B. Richards

Robert B. Richards is a retired librarian living in Fredericton. He has been a New Brunswicker forever and an on-again off-again contributor of poetry to different periodicals, notably The Fiddlehead and The Cormorant. His poetry chapbook Unfolding Fern was published by Spare Time Editions.
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Mary Jane Losier

Mary Jane Losier wrote "Whisper to the Wind" in memory of her mother-in-law, Lina Robichaud. She is a co-author of The Children of Lazarus: The Story of the Lazaretto at Tracadie (1987) and the author of Amanda Viger: Spiritual Healer to New Brunswick's Leprosy Victims (1999). She is the Community Liaison Representative in Bathurst for the Department of Extension, University of New Brunswick, and she gives workshops on life writing to children and adults.
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